Marketing modernising today’s music industry.

July saw music industry students flocking to the CollArts building on Brunswick St for an event organised by The Push and CollArts for its FReeZA Summit 2017.

An estimated 150 students from all over Victoria attended the summit, which facilitated workshops and talks by music industry professionals like Paige Cho – Head of marketing for the Melbourne born company ‘Bolster’. Based in Collingwood, with an additional office in Brooklyn, New York City, Bolster has worked with big music acts like Flume, Queens of the Stone Age and Angus and Julia Stone.

The Push, a not for profit youth music organisation based in Victoria and established in 1986, mentor youth interested in breaking into the music industry. The Push hosts a number of educational events and programs to inspire young people to get involved in music.

Jeanine Orr, head of finance and administration of The Push said it acts as an “advisory centre for CollArts and Youth Central (a state government support website for youth aged 12-25)”. The FReeZA committee and events are funded by the Department of Health and Human Services.

Cho, 30, puts her success within the notoriously difficult music industry down to having raw passion and a mind for good business.

Her talk at the summit on Friday July 14th, to a room of young CollArts students, encompassed the importance of advertising on Facebook in the music scene. She boasts an 11-year successful career within the music industry.

“I started out completing a psychology degree after high school but, at 19 I decided I wanted to get into the music industry,” She told The Yarra Reporter.

Cho started out as a music journalist and her passion and hard work ethic quickly got her gigs writing for Beat Magazine and MTV.

Paige Cho, head of marketing at Bolster. Photo: Caitlin Matticoli

She sympathises with the next generation of young people trying to get into the marketing and event planning industry and thinks it’s definitely not as easy as it used to be.

“I was lucky to land a position in marketing; after freelancing for various music publications I kind of just fell into it.”

“My psych degree has been useful [and] my advice to those who want to get into the industry is [to] keep learning and finding ways you can up-skill because that’s what’s going to give you the advantage over someone who hasn’t.”

Cho told students at the talk to get acquainted with photography, photoshop, finance and the legalities of the industry because while marketing for the music business is fun and exciting, you still have your work cut out for you if you want to make it big.

“Based on how much Facebook’s campaigning nuances have changed over the years, I probably wouldn’t have wanted to start in the marketing industry from scratch at the stage it is now,” Cho said.

The push pop up shop flyer. Photo: Caitlin Matticoli

Cho gave students important tips on boosting posts and streamlining demographics and also shared the importance of making sure accompanying images are as bright and clear as possible.

Written by Caitlin Matticoli

Submissions for Emerge 2017 are coming to a close

Call outs to get involved in the City of Yarra’s most inclusive celebration of multicultural arts and music, Emerge 2017, are coming to a close this Friday.

Created in 2004, in conjunction with Multicultural Arts Victoria’s (MAV) Visible Music Mentoring Program, Emerge 2017 started out as a humble arts festival and has grown into an all-encompassing series of art and music events taking place across the Yarra for one week at the end of June.

Emerge 2017 welcomes innovative music and art submissions from artists in the Yarra and provides an outstanding opportunity for newly arrived refugees and emerging communities to get involved in telling their stories and connecting with the community.

We spoke to Joel Ma, one of the creative producers, about all that is coming from this year’s event.

“It’s about opening up communities and neighbourhoods to the multicultural personalities and diversity that is around them and we often take for granted… and within that is this rich amount of human story and experience that we can all benefit from and embrace,” he said.

Cookin’ Up Community with South Sudanese spoken word poet Abe Nouk and South Sudanese singer Ajak Kwai (held at the Fitzroy Community Kitchen). Photo: James Henry Photography

“MAV gravitates towards innovative ideas and artistic pursuits,” he says,“The other side of [Emerge 2017] is to create amazing art, for us it’s about finding artists within [the Yarra] who represent all groups… to come together and collaborate and try ideas out and connect with where they live now.”

Emerge 2017 is also pushing the boundaries of the mainstream music scene by challenging expectations of many mainstream musicians who are of the notion that multicultural arts and music can’t be separated from the traditional.

“From the music perspective, I’m very interested in the idea that multiculturalism includes more than just a traditional view of art or view of music. It can sometimes be engaged with traditional instruments, but that could be offset with electronics or contemporary music collaboration… And that is where you’ll find the most popular music of today,” said Joel.

With a philosophy of celebrating the positive contributions of newly arrived refugee groups, and embracing diverse art and music in the Yarra community, Emerge 2017 is definitely something we can get behind.

In its 13th year and thriving with strong connections to community leaders and cultural groups, Emerge 2017 is only expected to continue to cultivate its invaluable contribution to the community.

The submission deadline is 5 pm Friday the 5th of May, with all submissions going to Freja Macfarlane at

Schools out, rock out. Shimmerlands festival to take over Melbourne Uni campus

The University of Melbourne has decided to use up vacant space over summer in a way that will have the students running back to school when they would usually run away.

Shimmerlands is a new two-month long festival run by event producing group Shadow Electric, aiming to enliven the University of Melbourne in Parkville over the summer break.

Kicking off January 1 and running until February 26, the festival will include film, music, art and hospitality both during the day and during the balmy summer nights.

The indoor concert hall and outdoor music amphitheatre will host a plethora of local and international acts, and Shadow Electric’s Creative Director Jay Rayner says there will be no limitations on genre.

There will be six major outdoor music shows across the two months, one being Brooklyn-based Parquet Courts with further big announcements to follow.

“The advantage of Shimmerlands running over two months is that we can be more curatorial about our selection of artists and lineup, and can even be confirming acts during January and February,” Jay said.

Courtney Barnett performing at a previous Shadow Electric event.
Courtney Barnett performing at a previous Shadow Electric event. Photo: Shadow Electric

Shimmerlands hopes to showcase all of Melbourne’s thriving music scene, with local promoters and tastemakers crafting the music program.

The event will also host an outdoor cinema to rival the Outdoor Cinema at Abbotsford Convent: the project that originally brought Shadow Electric into the public eye.

The film program will host over 45 major new releases including the new Ghostbusters and La La Land, alongside contemporary independent films, music documentaries and favourite cult classics.

Shadow Electric Outdoor Cinema event
Shadow Electric Outdoor Cinema event. Photo: Shadow Electric

The Cinema will be one of four main precincts at Shimmerlands hosting a range of both ticketed and public proceedings, together with The Pavilion, Live Music arena and The Food Quarter.

The Pavilion will be the heart of the event, with the structure having been designed by Ha Architects and University of Melbourne graduates. And housing a bar and areas for relaxing, the multiple drinking and dining options in the Food Quarter will get the attention of local foodies.

Melbourne foodie Jess Ho has fetched over 20 of Melbourne’s best restaurants to present outdoor kitchen installations for the event. This includes St Ali, Pho Nom, Pidapip Gelateria, Chadong Mumma, Trattoria Emilia and many more.

“The idea behind Shimmerlands was to create something new, internationally appealing and culturally relevant to Melbourne, and all within the urban gem of the University of Melbourne,” Rayner said.

Afternoons at Shimmerlands. Photo: Shadow Electric

Shadow Electric was founded in 2011 and the founders Jay Rayner and David Chetwig were quick to grow a name for themselves after multiple successful music and cinematic events.

Now taking on their most elusive event yet, the boys are excited to see it all come together.

Be sure to check out their website for updates in the lead up to January 1. Shimmerlands will be adding performances, acts and screenings daily as well as massive announcements.

Written by Caitlyn Leggett

11 Reasons Why The Yarra Is Ace: A World Photo Day Celebration

It’s world photo day and we want to celebrate 177 years of photography by showcasing what makes the City of Yarra so amazing. Here are just a few reasons that we’re humbled to be part of the Yarra community.

1. Respecting and acknowledging the Wurundjeri people, who are the traditional owners of this land.



2.  The art – fine art, street art, performance art, you name it, we got it.


Installation of James Bonnici’s new solo exhibition at Lindberg Galleries. @lindberggalleries @jamesbonniciart

A photo posted by LINDBERG GALLERIES (@lindberggalleries) on



The most creative traffic light busking I have ever seen! #busking #circusact #circus #hoddlestreet #melbourne 👌😂😜

A photo posted by c o r r i n e | n e w m a n (@rinnie_newman) on



3. With hundreds of places to park your behind, food definitely makes the list.


A photo posted by @cookingwithangandnik on





4. Inclusion, acceptance, tolerance and humanity feature strongly throughout the Yarra community.

When he left traces of rainbow prints so you won’t get lost 🌈 #morning #coffeehunting #gertrudest #victoria #melbourne #rainbow

A photo posted by Anisa Ornella Octaviana (@ornellanor) on



@cityofyarra we salute you. 👍 even if I did get a parking fine in Smith Street…

A photo posted by Blanka Dudas (@icamebyboat) on



5. The diversity, rich culture, beautiful colours and flavours. Without these we’d probably be South Yarra (not that there’s anything wrong with that).


#johnstonstreetfiesta #spanish #festival #paella #hispanic #melbourne 💃

A photo posted by SOPHIA ARGIRIOU | MELBOURNE (@emeraldwink) on



Come celebrate Melbourne’s vibrant hispanic community, today is the final day of the #johnstonstreetfiesta for 2015.

A photo posted by Food/events/bars/restaurants (@melbournetodo) on




6. There’s a never-ending list of things to see and do.

Here’s to capturing the last days of the Gertrude Street Projection Festival @_gspf.

A photo posted by True Tribe (@true_tribe) on




7. Who could forget Mary Rogers helping people cross the street over on Bridge Road in Richmond


// councils efforts to represent women via their social media streams.



8. I’m going to leave this one blank because i don’t know how to describe whatever this is.



9. Love it or hate it the deconstructed coffee is said to have originated in Abbotsford…



Oops wrong one, sorry about that. Here it is…



10. The iconic Edinburgh Gardens. A place for friends, family and community.



Which more importantly, is the location of a Pikachu.



11. And last but not least is Yarra’s commitment to sustainability.




Unfortunately Kanye’s Pablo pop-up store didn’t make the list, better luck next time buddy.


By Tiyana Matliovski