Arts recognise local Aboriginal history

This month a collection of indigenous performers and artists are coming together for Smith Street Dreaming as part of the annual Leaps and Bound Music festival.

Smith Street Dreaming 2017 is the biggest street celebration of the iconic thoroughfare’s Koorie history. The festival brings diverse groups of people to the suburbs of Collingwood and Fitzroy to recognise indigenous culture, the local Wurundjeri people, and its aboriginal community.

The free event will host some of the country’s best indigenous talent featuring live performances from Frank Yamma, Emma Donovan, Yung Warriors, Indigenous Hip Hop Projects, traditional dancers  Jindi Worabak and MC Shelley Ware.

The project is part of the Smith Street Working Group that, according to organisers, aims to build and celebrate better relationships between Yarra Council residents, workers and visitors to Smith Street by fostering understanding, respect and peace between all.

Members of the Smith Street Working Group include Aboriginal elders, indigenous community members, Victoria’s Neighbourhood Justice Centre (NJC), Yarra City Council, Victoria Police, the Salvation Army, Co-Health, Regional Aboriginal Justice Advisory Committee, Smith Street Business Association, Eastern Health, Melbourne Aboriginal Youth Sport and Recreation Co-Operative (MAYSAR) and restaurant Charcoal Lane.

The event was initiated when The Neighbourhood Justice Centre collaborated with Aboriginal elders, police and traders to discuss the complex issues of social inclusion, cultural respect, safety and diversity, which eventually lead to the formation of the Smith Street working group. Members of the working group realised they all wanted the same thing, and the indigenous music festival was born.

On the Smith Street Dreaming report NJC project officer, Maree Foelz, describes Smith Street Dreaming as “a fantastic event which helped build better relationships between the various communities that visit, live, work and gather on and around Smith Street,” which also encouraged her, personally, to “embrace the opportunity to learn from being part of the Smith Street Working Group.”

Rebecca Langley, lead activist in the community’s  Everything Advisory Group, this year is working with MAYSAR on a project for Smith Street Dreaming. With the focus of the event being reconciliation, respect and fairness, she believes that this will help show the broader community the importance of indigenous history to the area and the ability to connect with it.

To Amnesty International, she said: “I believe that Reconciliation Action Plans are a great opportunity to decolonise our work spaces by acknowledging and acting to change the part we play in the ongoing oppression of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.”

Smith Street Dreaming aims to bring together indigenous and non-indigenous community members to reconcile.

Image of Archie Roach at Smith Street Dreaming 2015, Photo: Antony Ket

In an interview for the Yarra Council’s history project, Archie Roach, indigenous Australian singer explained the importance of Fitzroy as a meeting place for Aboriginals.

“There was more to it than drinking. If people just saw it on the outside, you know, they’d just think, oh, a couple of old or young Koori people drinking in a pack, or whatever, vacant lot, vacant area – but it was more than that. That’s where I learned my history brother, from those areas, because all the old fellas, they knew more about me than I did, mate.”

Those who gather in Smith Street are referred to as “Parkies”, being mostly Aboriginal people who have long gathered on Smith Street. The ‘community of the Parkies’ has been fundamental for the passing on of Aboriginal stories and history according to the Smith Street Dreaming report.

Indigenous Hip Hop Project performer at Smith Street Dreaming 2016. Photo: Tony Proudfoot

The Indigenous Hip Hop Project team has experience in performing in events focusing on inclusiveness and recognition especially surrounding this particular event.

“The indigenous Hip hop Project team has [had] interactive performances running for 10 years … most performing in remote Aboriginal communities as well as everywhere around Australia,” said managing director, Michael Farah.

Having been involved in the Leaps and Bound music festival, the group realised the importance of hosting events like this giving them the platform to express themselves and perform.

“Dance performances for the event showcase more art going to hip hop [and therefore is] trying to get everyone [at the event] involved,” he said.

“Everyone is attached to music, most performances come with music and culturally it is about music and dance. Stories are told through traditional instrument[s] and also done through movement which is the best way to showcase because culturally, nothing is written down.”

He then went on to explain the ‘dreaming’ aspect of the festival and the importance of it.

“Everything is a story and [is] about dreaming … dreaming is sitting down listening to elders. This festival is bringing all that to the table. It is crucial to modern-day society when talking about bridging the gap and reconciliation.”

Smith Street Dreaming 2017 is taking place on the corner of Smith Street and Stanley Street, Collingwood, from 1pm-5pm, on Saturday, July 22.

For details go to Leaps and Bound Music festival website leapsandboundsmusicfestival.com.

Written by Zathia Bazeer

Schools out, rock out. Shimmerlands festival to take over Melbourne Uni campus

The University of Melbourne has decided to use up vacant space over summer in a way that will have the students running back to school when they would usually run away.

Shimmerlands is a new two-month long festival run by event producing group Shadow Electric, aiming to enliven the University of Melbourne in Parkville over the summer break.

Kicking off January 1 and running until February 26, the festival will include film, music, art and hospitality both during the day and during the balmy summer nights.

The indoor concert hall and outdoor music amphitheatre will host a plethora of local and international acts, and Shadow Electric’s Creative Director Jay Rayner says there will be no limitations on genre.

There will be six major outdoor music shows across the two months, one being Brooklyn-based Parquet Courts with further big announcements to follow.

“The advantage of Shimmerlands running over two months is that we can be more curatorial about our selection of artists and lineup, and can even be confirming acts during January and February,” Jay said.

Courtney Barnett performing at a previous Shadow Electric event.
Courtney Barnett performing at a previous Shadow Electric event. Photo: Shadow Electric

Shimmerlands hopes to showcase all of Melbourne’s thriving music scene, with local promoters and tastemakers crafting the music program.

The event will also host an outdoor cinema to rival the Outdoor Cinema at Abbotsford Convent: the project that originally brought Shadow Electric into the public eye.

The film program will host over 45 major new releases including the new Ghostbusters and La La Land, alongside contemporary independent films, music documentaries and favourite cult classics.

Shadow Electric Outdoor Cinema event
Shadow Electric Outdoor Cinema event. Photo: Shadow Electric

The Cinema will be one of four main precincts at Shimmerlands hosting a range of both ticketed and public proceedings, together with The Pavilion, Live Music arena and The Food Quarter.

The Pavilion will be the heart of the event, with the structure having been designed by Ha Architects and University of Melbourne graduates. And housing a bar and areas for relaxing, the multiple drinking and dining options in the Food Quarter will get the attention of local foodies.

Melbourne foodie Jess Ho has fetched over 20 of Melbourne’s best restaurants to present outdoor kitchen installations for the event. This includes St Ali, Pho Nom, Pidapip Gelateria, Chadong Mumma, Trattoria Emilia and many more.

“The idea behind Shimmerlands was to create something new, internationally appealing and culturally relevant to Melbourne, and all within the urban gem of the University of Melbourne,” Rayner said.

outdoor-drinks-in-the-courtyard
Afternoons at Shimmerlands. Photo: Shadow Electric

Shadow Electric was founded in 2011 and the founders Jay Rayner and David Chetwig were quick to grow a name for themselves after multiple successful music and cinematic events.

Now taking on their most elusive event yet, the boys are excited to see it all come together.

Be sure to check out their website for updates in the lead up to January 1. Shimmerlands will be adding performances, acts and screenings daily as well as massive announcements.

Written by Caitlyn Leggett